Category Archives: archaeology

Weekend Mountain Rail Blogging

Tyrolean omniscient and Friend of the Blog Paschberg sends a photo of greeting from the Seefelder Sattel, a little pass over the most easily navigable part of the Karwendel Mountains, and known as a point along the alignment of the … Continue reading

Posted in archaeology, Austria, Bavaria, blogs, Mountains, nature, Roman roads, travel | 1 Comment

In Via: Raisting

* If one is interested, as I am, in the routes of the Roman roads in southern Bavaria, then one has probably heard of Raisting; the north-to-south road from the Brenner Pass to Augsburg (Via Raetia) and the southwest-to-northeast road … Continue reading

Posted in archaeology, Bavaria, Germany, history, lives of others, Mountains, nature, Roman roads, travel | 2 Comments

Soviodurum, and a Mysterious Stone Object

I had the chance to visit Straubing, a small town along the Danube in Lower Bavaria – basically I was there on business, but arrived a few hours earlier in order to see the Roman exhibit at the town museum. … Continue reading

Posted in archaeology, Bavaria, Germany, history, Roman roads, travel | 2 Comments

Circumitus: Batavis, Boiodurum

(The name actually refers to the bicycle route and is not, apparently, what the Romans called it.) This posting hails from the other side of Bavaria, a “detour” onto the Roman road which follows the Danube and also the boundary … Continue reading

Posted in archaeology, assimilation, Bavaria, culture, Germany, history, Roman roads, travel | 4 Comments

In via: Abodiacum

There’s more to Epfach, an unassuming little village along the Lech, than first meets the eye. It’s a very, very old settlement, in fact. Older, even, then most German towns — Munich, for example, was first established in the 12th … Continue reading

Posted in archaeology, art, Bavaria, Germany, history, lives of others, Roman roads, travel | 3 Comments

A Idea of Mine

I have a confession to make. Beyond all the other things I am doing right now – singing, translating, assisting in a bookselling business – I have a project in mind for the future. I want to put together a … Continue reading

Posted in archaeology, culture, Germany, history, Italy, Life Abroad, literature, memory, travel | 5 Comments

Oedenburg Castle, Bavaria

Not far from the Ammersee in southern Bavaria lies a hill upon which the ruins of Oedenburg Castle are found. It was a small hilltop fortress, mostly a tower judging from the size of the hill. I have been looking … Continue reading

Posted in archaeology, Germany, history, nature, theater | 1 Comment

Teriolis ≠ Tirol

Continuing in the looking-up-one-thing-and-finding-the-tip-of-the-iceberg vein, I recently began looking into an assumption I had made a while back — that the name Tirol was derived from the Roman fortress Teriolis (from which the village of Zirl takes its name). It … Continue reading

Posted in archaeology, assimilation, Austria, Germany, history, Italy, language | 3 Comments

A Stone Marker on the West Bank of the Ammersee

Sometimes the act of looking up one thing takes me to another things, and then something else altogether. This post, for example. This is a path on the west bank of the Ammersee between Utting and Schondorf. The stone column … Continue reading

Posted in archaeology, Germany, history, lives of others, memory, travel | 2 Comments

Forgotten Bavaria: St. Johannes auf der Bergerin

(What’s left of a few signs which may have once indicated the original site./ Was von den Resten übrig blieb, die einmal den ursprünglichen Standort angedeutet haben könnten.) Many centuries ago, west of the Ammersee in southern Bavaria, the main … Continue reading

Posted in archaeology, Germany, history, memory, nature, travel | 2 Comments