Category Archives: archaeology

Forgotten Bavaria: St. Johannes auf der Bergerin

(What’s left of a few signs which may have once indicated the original site./ Was von den Resten übrig blieb, die einmal den ursprünglichen Standort angedeutet haben könnten.) Many centuries ago, west of the Ammersee in southern Bavaria, the main … Continue reading

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A Chapel in Axams

A free Sunday afternoon and it happens to be Tag des Denkmals in Austria. This is a day for  cultural and historical monuments across the country, and often there is the chance to see something not normally open to the … Continue reading

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Reading the Tabula Peutingeriana

The Tabula Peutingeriana is a 13th century copy of a Roman road map from around the 4th or 5th century CE, judging by the place names on it. It is named for Konrad Peutinger, a man of letters from 16th-century … Continue reading

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Der Hofstetter Frauenwald

A few months ago I quickly photographed a field of grave mounds along the main road from Hofstetten to Pürgen. / Vor ein paar Monaten habe ich schnell ein Feld von Grabhügeln entlang der Hauptstraße von Hofstetten nach Pürgen fotografiert. … Continue reading

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Cambodunum – Kempten

An artist’s rendition of the stone layers of an inside wall in the kleine Therme.   Kempten, in the Allgäu region, is one of Germany’s oldest cities. Earliest mention appears to be by the ancient Greek geographer Strabo, who called … Continue reading

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Those Damn Socialist Roman Roads

Just poking around the internet for information on the Via Raetia (the Roman Road from northern Italy to Augsburg) and exactly where it would have joined the Via Julia (the Roman Road from Salzburg to Augsburg). I found this, and … Continue reading

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Why One Cannot Cycle The Roman Road in Bavaria

It’s the faint line running diagonally through the fields, between the villages of Wielenbach and Raisting. Image from this informative collection of Via Raetia images from Mittenwald to the Ammersee. (In German, but the photos are nice.)

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Two Roads in Utting

On a small, wooden sign posted along a dirt road outside of Utting am Ammersee, not far from the Celtic Schanze in Achselschwang: Nach der Eroberung des südbayerischen Raumes 15 v. Chr. enstand zunächst dessen neue Hauptstadt: Augusta Vindelicorum, das … Continue reading

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And While We’re In The 15th Century…

…it’s only a short jump ahead to the time of Emperor Ferdinand II and Philippine Welser, both of whom figure in the local story of the Roßsprung (“horse jump”). Paschberg has a post up about the story and the now-urban … Continue reading

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It’s All Related

And here we tie the two previous posts together with a 15th-century ribbon: Und hier fügen wir die beiden vorherigen Beiträge mit einem Band aus dem 15. Jahrhundert zusammen: Albrecht Dürer, Brenner Road in the Eisack Valley, 1495. Made, as … Continue reading

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