Author Archives: Marcellina

Hardy’s Map

While packing for a long train trip to Styria, I pulled a couple of books of the shelf to help pass the time. Thomas Hardy’s “The Return of the Native” was I book I supposedly had read in high school … Continue reading

Posted in art, literature | 2 Comments

Teriolis ≠ Tirol

Continuing in the looking-up-one-thing-and-finding-the-tip-of-the-iceberg vein, I recently began looking into an assumption I had made a while back — that the name Tirol was derived from the Roman fortress Teriolis (from which the village of Zirl takes its name). It … Continue reading

Posted in archaeology, assimilation, Austria, Germany, history, Italy, language | 3 Comments

A Stone Marker on the West Bank of the Ammersee

Sometimes the act of looking up one thing takes me to another things, and then something else altogether. This post, for example. This is a path on the west bank of the Ammersee between Utting and Schondorf. The stone column … Continue reading

Posted in archaeology, Germany, history, lives of others, memory, travel | 2 Comments

The Odd (and Beautiful) Nikolauskirche in Hall // Die seltsame (und schöne) Nikolauskirche in Hall

Dear Reader, I did this little trip to Hall in Tirol more for me than for you, as I knew I needed to get out of the house. Three straight months of rehearsals for three different productions, plus teaching private … Continue reading

Posted in Austria, culture, history, lives of others, travel | 2 Comments

Forgotten Bavaria: St. Johannes auf der Bergerin

(What’s left of a few signs which may have once indicated the original site./ Was von den Resten übrig blieb, die einmal den ursprünglichen Standort angedeutet haben könnten.) Many centuries ago, west of the Ammersee in southern Bavaria, the main … Continue reading

Posted in archaeology, Germany, history, memory, nature, travel | 2 Comments

Notburga of Rattenberg

First, a bit of background on Notburga (pronounced Note-boor-ga). She was born in Rattenberg, a small town east of Innsbruck, around 1265 to a couple of hatmakers, and proved to be an extraordinarily intelligent and competent woman. She hired herself … Continue reading

Posted in art, Austria, culture, history, lives of others, memory | 3 Comments

Götzens, Pfarrkirche Hl. Peter und Paul

A few years ago I came across a booklet with brief biographies of four local priests who had resisted the Nazis and were killed for it. While planning my recent visit to Axams, I realized that I would be very … Continue reading

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A Chapel in Axams

A free Sunday afternoon and it happens to be Tag des Denkmals in Austria. This is a day for  cultural and historical monuments across the country, and often there is the chance to see something not normally open to the … Continue reading

Posted in archaeology, art, Austria, culture, current events, history, Innsbruck, memory

Licus

A beautiful late-summer Saturday afternoon walking along the Lech River, south of Landsberg. The river was full of swans, dozens of them, and as we walked  an enormous flock of honking wild geese came in over the trees and landed … Continue reading

Posted in Germany, history, language, nature

Reading the Tabula Peutingeriana

The Tabula Peutingeriana is a 13th century copy of a Roman road map from around the 4th or 5th century CE, judging by the place names on it. It is named for Konrad Peutinger, a man of letters from 16th-century … Continue reading

Posted in archaeology, Germany, history, Innsbruck, Italy