We’ll Be Back On Soon

This summer didn’t go quite as planned. But things will get back to normal soon, I hope. In the meantime, here’s something from the Pennsylvania woods. Dieser Sommer verlief nicht wie geplant. Aber alles wird sich hoffentlich wieder normalisieren. Derweil etwas aus den Wäldern Pennsylvanias:

IMG_0721A songbird killing. The perp was most likely an owl or a hawk (we have them both around here — the hawks* circle high above during the day, the screech owls take over the territory at nightfall.) Ermordung eines Singvogels. Täter war aller Wahrscheinlichkeit nach eine Eule oder ein Habicht. Die Habichte* ziehen untertags in der Luft ihre Kreise, die kreischenden Eulen übernehmen das Gelände bei Einbruch der Nacht.

*unless they are turkey vultures / falls sie nicht Truthahngeier sind

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8 Responses to We’ll Be Back On Soon

  1. Carlisle says:

    Hello Marcellina! After studying your photo Bob said he thinks the victim was a mourning dove & “probably” a sharpshinned hawk did it.

  2. Carlisle says:

    Although now he says a redtailed hawk! Or maybe even a Cooper’s!🙂

  3. paschberg says:

    Hawk killing songbird. Creepy. I hope no cultural statement.
    Now some translation Exercise:-)

    Dieser Sommer verlief nicht wie geplant. Aber alles wird sich hoffentlich wieder normalisieren. Derweil etwas aus den Wäldern Pennsylvanias (bzw. aus Penns Waldland):
    Ermordung eines Singvogels. Täter war aller Wahrscheinlichkeit nach eine Eule oder ein Habicht. Die Habichte* ziehen untertags in der Luft ihre Kreise, die kreischenden Eulen übernehmen das Gelände bei Einbruch der Nacht.
    *falls sie nicht Truthahngeier sind

  4. Marcellina says:

    Die Truthahngeier sind lustig. Wenn es sehr viel schneit (fast ein Meter tief), sie spazieren um das Haus herum und schauen in die Fenstern hinein!

  5. ellroon says:

    I don’t think turkey vultures hunt prey.. only dead things. I’ve seen groups of fifty or more circling over a dead deer. We also have in our suburban neighborhood a nesting pair of hawks as well as a falcon. So we’ve seen feathery remains like that many times….

  6. Marcellina says:

    ellroon you are right about the turkey vultures and I should have included that — I had meant to say that the large dark birds circling over the treetops may not have been hawks at all (and the woods is just dense enough so as not to afford us a good clear look at them.) But according to my father, both are around. I still wonder if it may have been an owl, because I heard one every evening.(Click the first two A and B songs at this link: http://www.owlpages.com/owls.php?genus=Megascops&species=asio )

  7. Carlisle says:

    Bob says (yes, another “Bob says”!) that an owl would have eaten the feathers rather than pluck them

  8. Marcellina says:

    Thanks. Bob is our Go-To Man for “Outdoor Lore”!

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